Return to site

Helping Others Overcome Grief

Dr Elizma van der Smit. April 2018

· Life Skills,Mind

If you have ever gone through the grieving process, you would think that when you do it again,you willhandle it better the next time around. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. You will feel just as bad each subsequent time. It’s a necessary process in life, however. Where experiencing it previously can come in handy, is helping others who are going through the grieving process.

If you are facedwith trying to help someone who is grieving, make sure that you are not trying to force your experience on them. People grieve in different ways. What worked for you will not work for everyone. Try to hone in on how the person you are trying to help is dealing with the situation and go from there.

The most important aspect of helping is to bethere for the person. This isespecially true after the dust settles and there is no one left but the grievingperson. Shortly afterdeath,there are ceremonies and gatherings. These are good for the people grieving and helps to get their mind off of the situation. But, eventually the crowds die down,and a feeling of lonelinesscan overtake those who are grieving. By sticking around for a bit longer, you can take away those lonely feelings, at least temporarily.

Try to keep alcohol use down to a minimum, if at all. It’s easy for people who are grieving to use their situation as an excuse to go overboard with alcohol. This canturn into a long-term problem if it is not keptin check.

Be ready to help when they ask for it. Offer to run errands for them if that is what is needed. People who are grieving don’t think much about eating, so make sure that they get food and watch them eat. At first, they don’t believe they are hungry, but once they start eating, they find they are much hungrier than they realized.

Sometimes staying silent and just listening can be the best advice when helping others to grieve. They are trying to come to grips with what is going on and the last thing they want to hear is, “it’ll get better,” or something along those lines. Just let them do most of the talking.

This post is for informational purposes only. It should not be considered therapy.This blog is only for informational and educational purposes and should not be considered therapy or any form of treatment. We are not able to respond to specific questions or comments about personal situations, appropriate diagnosis or treatment, or otherwise provide any clinical opinions. If you think you need immediate assistance, call your local doctor/psychologist or psychiatrist or the SADAG Mental Health Line on 011 234 4837. If necessary, please phone the Suicide Crisis Line on 0800 567 567 or sms 31393.

All Posts
×

Almost done…

We just sent you an email. Please click the link in the email to confirm your subscription!

OKSubscriptions powered by Strikingly

This blog is only for informational and educational purposes and should not be considered therapy or any form of treatment. We are not able to respond to specific questions or comments about personal situations, appropriate diagnosis or treatment, or otherwise provide any clinical opinions. If you think you need immediate assistance, call your local doctor/psychologist or psychiatrist or the SADAG Mental health Line on 011 234 4837. If necessary, please phone the Suicide Crisis Line on 0800 567 567 or sms 31393.